How To Get Rid Of A Tickle In Your Throat That Causes Coughing

How To Get Rid Of A Tickle In Your Throat That Causes Coughing

Have you ever had a tickle in your throat that just won’t go away? It can be very frustrating, especially if it also causes coughing. There are many reasons why this could be happening, such as allergies, GERD, or even just a dry throat. Whatever the cause may be, there are several things you can try at home to get rid of the tickle and stop the coughing. Here are some tips to help you find relief.

Drink Plenty of Fluids

One of the best things you can do for a tickle in your throat is to drink plenty of fluids. This will help keep your throat hydrated, which can reduce irritation and inflammation. Try drinking water, tea, or warm broth throughout the day to soothe your throat. You can also try drinking warm lemon water with honey, which can help ease coughing and provide a natural source of antioxidants.

Use a Humidifier

If your home is dry, a humidifier can help add moisture to the air. This can be especially helpful if you have a tickle in your throat due to dryness. Keep a humidifier in your bedroom at night, and try to keep the humidity level around 40-50%. This can help keep your throat hydrated and reduce irritation.

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Gargle with Salt Water

Gargling with salt water is a time-tested remedy for a sore throat. The salt works as an anti-inflammatory, while the warmth of the water can help soothe your throat. To make a saltwater gargle, mix 1/2 teaspoon of salt with 8 ounces of warm water. Gargle with the mixture for 15-30 seconds, and then spit it out. Repeat this several times a day to help relieve symptoms.

Use a Cough Drop or Lozenge

A cough drop or lozenge can help soothe a tickle in your throat and reduce coughing. Look for products that contain menthol or eucalyptus, which can help numb your throat and provide relief. Just be sure not to use lozenges that contain too much sugar, as this can increase the risk of tooth decay.

Avoid Irritants

If you have a tickle in your throat, it’s important to avoid irritants that can make the problem worse. This includes smoking, secondhand smoke, and exposure to pollutants or chemicals. If you’re a smoker, quitting can be one of the best things you can do for your health.

Take Over-The-Counter Medications

If home remedies aren’t enough to provide relief, you may need to take over-the-counter medications. Antihistamines can help if your symptoms are due to seasonal allergies. Decongestants can help if you have congestion in your throat or sinuses. You can also try cough suppressants, which can help reduce coughing.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What causes a tickle in your throat?

A: There are many possible causes of a tickle in your throat. This can include allergies, asthma, GERD, postnasal drip, or even just a dry throat.

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Q: How long does a tickle in your throat last?

A: The length of time that a tickle in your throat lasts can vary depending on the cause. In most cases, it will go away on its own within a few days.

Q: Is a tickle in your throat contagious?

A: No, a tickle in your throat is not contagious. It is typically caused by an irritation or inflammation in your throat, rather than a virus or bacteria.

Q: Should I see a doctor for a tickle in my throat?

A: In most cases, a tickle in your throat will go away on its own without treatment. However, if your symptoms are severe or accompanied by other symptoms such as fever or difficulty breathing, you should see a doctor as soon as possible.

In conclusion, a tickle in your throat can be very irritating and cause coughing. However, there are several things you can try at home to find relief. Drink plenty of fluids, use a humidifier, gargle with salt water, and avoid irritants. If home remedies aren’t enough, you can try over-the-counter medications or see a doctor for further treatment. By taking care of your throat and avoiding potential irritants, you can help reduce the risk of future tickles and coughing episodes.

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